“Is that Pedro?” -Happy Thanksgiving from Comet Over Hollywood

Sometimes holiday family gatherings can be awkward, if not disastrous.

One cinematic example of an unhappy Thanksgiving is in “Giant” (1956) starring Elizabeth Taylor, James Dean and Rock Hudson.

The film follows Bick (Hudson) and Leslie (Taylor) and their life as cattle ranchers in Texas. Leslie, originally from Maryland, marries Bick after knowing him for a short time, and their marriage is tumultuous.

At one part of the film, Leslie travels back to Maryland with her children to evaluate her marriage, participate in her sister’s wedding and spend Thanksgiving with her family.

During the visit, Leslie’s three children become attached to the turkey named Pedro…

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(Comet Over Hollywood/Screen Cap by Jessica P)

Here is to hoping your Thanksgiving is less dramatic.

Happy Thanksgiving! I am thankful for everyone of you who reads Comet Over Hollywood and shares the love of classic film.

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Happy Thanksgiving from Comet

Here we are, celebrating our third Comet Over Hollywood Thanksgiving together. And as the Bing Crosby song from “Holiday Inn” (1940) says…I have plenty to be thankful for.

Along with being thankful for my new job in Shelby, N.C., my family and friends, I am also thankful for classic films.

Cast of “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” (1938) David Holt, Ann Gillis, Georgie Billings, Jackie Moran, Tommy Kelly, Byron Armstrong, Cora Sue Collins and Mickey Rentschler

Since 2002 when classic films actively became part of my life, they have consistently brought joy into my life. But classic films haven’t just given my entertainment, its taught shown me snapshots of pop culture in the past and given me history lessons.

I am also thankful for all of the wonderful classic film fans who I’ve met through my blog and on Twitter. It’s wonderful to know there are other like-minded fans out there who cry during “Since You Went Away” or swoon over Joel McCrea.

So dear reader, in my 200th blog post, I am thankful for YOU.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Shirley Temple cooking the Thanksgiving turkey

Margaret O’Brien serving up dinner in 1947

Frank Sinatra carving the turkey

And Comet brought the pumpkin pie. Happy Thanksgiving, love Jessica

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Who’s that turkey?

Happy Thanksgiving from Gordon and Doris.

Several holiday themed TV shows and films have the theme of having a pet turkey that is destined to be Thanksgiving or Christmas dinner.  Through the months, the turkey has become a friend to the main character so they are reluctant to cover it with cranberry sauce on Thanksgiving day.

Here are two films that show this:

Wesley (Billy Gray) getting nervous at Thanksgiving dinner.

By the Light of the Silvery Moon (1953): This is the sequel of the Doris Day-Gordon MacRea romance “Moonlight Bay” (1951). These films are also based off of Booth Tarkington’s “Penrod” series, which is where Wesley Winfield’s (played by Billy Gray) shenanigans come from.
The Winfield’s have been raising a turkey for Thanksgiving dinner and naturally Wesley has gotten attached to the turkey named Gregory. He sets the turkey free and steals another. The family invites Mr. Winfield’s (Leon Ames) boss to Thanksgiving dinner and wants to impress.  Gregory somehow finds his way into the dining room during the meal. You can see what happens in the video below

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Happy Thanksgiving from Bing

Here’s to a Happy Thanksgiving to all of you and hoping that you are having a better time than Bing Crosby appears to be in this clip from “Holiday Inn” (1942).

A bit of trivia: The cartoon turkey at the beginning of the clip is parodying F.D.R’s attempt to change the date of Thanksgiving, according to IMDB.

Few classic films talk about Thanksgiving but if you are looking for some before jumping into Christmas movies here are a couple:

-Holiday Inn (1942): It is mainly considered a Christmas film, but all holidays, including Thanksgiving, are celebrated in this movie.

-Miracle on 34th Street (1947): This also is mainly a Christmas film, but the movie starts off with the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and Maureen O’Hara coordinating the parade. Natalie Wood watches the parade from  John Payne’s apartment window and later invites Payne to dinner.

-Plymouth Adventure (1952): Gene Tierney, Spencer Tracy and Van  Johnson don’t sit down and eat a turkey dinner during the film, but it is the story of pilgrims traveling over on the Mayflower to the new world.

Happy Thanksgiving all!

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