Musical Monday: Love Me Forever (1935)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 600. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.

love me forever 1935This week’s musical:
Love Me Forever (1935) – Musical #720

Studio:
Columbia Pictures

Director:
Victor Schertzinger

Starring:
Grace Moore, Leo Carrillo, Robert Allen, Spring Byington, Michael Bartlett, Luis Alberni, Douglass Dumbrille, Thurston Hall, Olin Howland (uncredited), Arthur Hoyt (uncredited),

Plot:
Margaret Howard (Moore) comes from a wealthy family, who have lost everything. Opera loving hood Steve Corelli (Carrillo) hears Margaret sing and wants to make her a great opera star. Steve makes Margaret a great singing star, while falling in love with her; knowing she doesn’t reciprocate the feeling.

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Musical Monday: Ballad in Blue (1965)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 600. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.

This week’s musical:
Ballad in Blue (1965) – Musical #733

ballad

Studio:
Alsa Productions, distributed by 20th Century Fox

Director:
Paul Henreid

Starring:
Themselves: Ray Charles, The Raelettes
Actors: Tom Bell, Mary Peach, Dawn Addams, Piers Bishop, Betty McDowall, Joe Adams, Anne Padwick, Monika Henreid,

Plot:
While Ray Charles (himself) is performing at a school for a school for blind children, he meets and befriends David (Bishop). David’s mother Peggy (Peach) is overprotective of her son, which makes her constantly at odds with her boyfriend Steve (Bell), who thinks the child should have more independence. Ray tries to show Peggy that David can live successfully without his sight, but also recommends a surgeon who may be able to help them. Ray also offers a job to Steve as a music arranger and composer. Steve wants Peggy and David to travel with them, but Peggy is reluctant to uproot David.

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Musical Monday: Up in Arms (1944)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 600. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.

up in arms6This week’s musical:
Up in Arms (1944) – Musical #205

Studio:
Samuel Goldwyn Productions, Distributed by RKO

Director:
Elliott Nugent

Starring:
Danny Kaye, Dana Andrews, Dinah Shore, Constance Dowling, Louis Calhern, Lyle Talbot, Elisha Cook Jr., Benny Baker, George Matthews, Tom Dugan, Walter Catlett, Lillian Randolph (uncredited)

The Goldwyn Girls: Virginia Mayo, Betty Alexander, Gale Adams, Gloria Anderson, Betty Bryant, Jan Bryant, Alma Carroll, Joan Chaffee, Linda Christian, Virginia Cruzon, Myrna Dell, Cindy Garner, Dorothy Garner, Myrna Dell, Inna Gest, Renee Godfrey, Ellen Hall, Eloise Hardt, June Harris, Mary Ann Hyde, Mildred Kornman, June Lang, Rosalyn Lee, Florence Lundeen, Mickey Malloy, Dorothy Merritt, Lorraine Miller, Mary Moore, Kay Morley, Diana Mumby, Lee Nugent, Dorothy Patrick, Shelby Payne, Helen Talbot, Ruth Valmy, Virginia Wicks, Audrey Young

Narrator: Knox Manning

Plot:
Hypochondriac Danny Weems (Kaye) is drafted into the Army. He’s in love with Mary (Dowling), who is in love with his pal Joe (Andrews), and Virginia (Shore) is in love with Danny. Despite all of his imaginary illnesses Danny (and Joe) are drafted. When Danny learns they are shipping off, he can’t bear to imagine leaving without Mary and sneaks her on to the ship.

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The tradition of Tom and Jerrys

The holiday season is filled with traditions, and some we see reflected on film.

One tradition I learned about from film is drinking the holiday beverage, Tom and Jerry.

In the film BEYOND TOMORROW (1940), three elderly businessmen live together and celebrate Christmas Eve. George Melton (Harry Carey), Allan Chadwick (C. Aubrey Smith) and Michael O’Brien (Charles Winninger) drink celebratory Tom and Jerry beverages. The three men then decide to toss three wallets out into the street and whoever returns the wallet will join them in Christmas dinner.

Prior to watching this film, I had never heard of a Tom and Jerry — which are not related to the cat and mouse cartoon characters — and I’ve wanted to try them myself.

A Tom and Jerry is a warm brandy Christmas cocktail, which is sort of similar to eggnog. The drink may date back to 1821 and British writer Pierce Egan’s book “Life in London.”

Inspired by BEYOND TOMORROW, I finally tried making this drink myself. After researching several recipes online, I went with the Liquor.com recipe, which yields a smaller batch.

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