Musical Monday: Three Little Girls in Blue (1946)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 500. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.

This week’s musical:
Three Little Girls In Blue (1946) – Musical #535

Studio:
20th Century Fox

Director:
H. Bruce Humberstone

Starring:
June Haver, George Montgomery, Vivian Blaine, Vera-Ellen, Celeste Holm, Frank Latimore, Charles Smith, Coleen Gray (uncredited), Gary Gray (uncredited), Ruby Dandridge (uncredited)

Plot:
Set in 1902, Pam (Haver), Liz (Blaine) and Myra (Ellen) are three sisters hoping to come into a large inheritance. When their windfall is less than expected, they decide to head to Atlantic City, NJ, to find rich husbands. Pam dresses as an elegant lady while Liz is her secretary and Myra the maid.

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Musical Monday: The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady (1950)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 500. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.


The_Daughter_of_Rosie_O'Grady_FilmPosterThis week’s musical:

“The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady” – Musical #387

Studio:
Warner Brothers

Director:
David Butler

Starring:
June Haver, Gordon MacRae, S.Z Sakall, Gene Nelson, Debbie Reynolds, Marcia Mae Jones, Jane Darwell, James Barton, Sean McClory, Virginia Lee

Plot:
Set right at the end of the Spanish-American War in 1898, overly protective father Dennis O’Grady (Barton) doesn’t want his three daughters (Haver, Reynolds, Jones) to be in show business. The vaudeville lifestyle is what caused his wife, Rosie O’Grady, to pass away. He also is wary of his daughters dating, though one is secretly married.
But Patricia (Haver)-the daughter of Rosie O’Grady- disobeys and walks through the theater district and meets Tony Pastor (Gordon). Tony takes a fancy to Patricia, and she starts a career in vaudeville and a romance with Tony.

Trivia:
-Debbie Reynold’s first speaking film. Previously she was in “June Bride” (1948) but did not have any lines.
-Gordon MacRae’s character plays Tony Pastor, who in real life was vaudeville performer and he owned a theater. He was known as the “Father of Vaudeville.” Though MacRae’s character shares a name with Pastor, there doesn’t seem to be any other similarity.

The O'Grady daughters: June Haver, Marcia Mae Jones, Debbie Reynolds

The O’Grady daughters: June Haver, Marcia Mae Jones, Debbie Reynolds

Highlights:
-Gene Nelson dancing. Nelson is one of the most underrated tap dancers of the Golden Era.
-Christmas is included in the movie. Christmas scenes always make me happy.
-Debbie Reynolds first time speaking on screen.

 

 

 

Notable Songs:
-“My Own True Love and I” sung by June Haver and James Barton
-“Winter” sung by June Haver
-“Daughter of Rosie O’Grady” sung by Gordon MacRae

june haverMy Review:
“Daughter of Rosie O’Grady” is visually beautiful in Technicolor and chock full of Warner contract players.
However, it does not seem to be in any way connected with the 1943 20th Century Fox film “Sweet Rosie O’Grady” starring Betty Grable. No, it doesn’t appear that June Haver is supposed to be Grable’s daughter.
While the film is pleasant, something falls short.
I think it’s possibly because I feel like some of the talents are wasted.
Gene Nelson, who plays dancer Doug Martin in the film, is probably one of the most underrated dancers of the Golden Era. But that superlative isn’t obvious in this movie.
He has one solo dance and a few partner dances with Miss Haver, and while his footwork is fancy, it wasn’t enough to show off his true talent.
Golden voiced Gordon MacRae also doesn’t sing enough songs in this film.
When June Haver started in Hollywood, she was dubbed the “Pocket Betty Grable” and pitted as a rival to the star with the Million Dollar Legs. But when I see Haver in films, something is lacking that is in every Grable film for me.
She is pleasant, pretty, dances well and I like her well enough, but I can’t put my finger on what is missing.
I think the most notable thing about this film is 18-year-old Debbie Reynolds in her first speaking film role. She already had the energy and wit she was later known for.
I also love seeing former child actress Marcia Mae Jones as a lovely adult. You may know her as the snobby rich girl in “The Little Princess” (1939) who Shirley Temple dumps ashes on.
Actor James Barton was also a former vaudeville star. At the end he performs a comedic ice skating routine-but not wearing skates. One has to wonder if that was an old routine from his days on stage.
“Daughter of Rosie O’Grady” is pleasant. I wouldn’t say avoid it, but I also wouldn’t say to go out of your way to watch it.

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Musical Monday: Look for the Silver Lining (1949)

It’s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals.
In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 500. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals.

This week’s musical:
“Look for the Silver Lining” — Musical #133

look-for-the-silver-lining-movie-poster-1949-1020437158

Studio:
Warner Brothers

Director:
David Butler

Starring:
June Haver, Gordon MacRae, Ray Bolger, Charles Ruggles, Rosemary DeCamp, Lee Wilde, Lyn Wilde, S.Z. Sakall, Will Rogers Jr. (uncredited), Dick Simmons

Plot:
Biographical film of musical star Marilyn Miller, played by June Haver. The film follows Miller’s rise to fame as a singer and dancer, starting with her family vaudeville act until she is the top star on Broadway. The film begins when Miller joins her family’s act, “The Five Columbians,” with her mother, father and two sisters. Miller meets famous vaudeville dancer Jack Donahue (Bolger) who helps her break into show business and is responsible for her first show on Broadway. During her big break, Haver meets actor Frank Carter (MacRae) and the two eventually marry.

Trivia:

Marilyn Miller in 1929

The real Marilyn Miller in 1929

-Marilyn Miller, played by Haver, was a famous Broadway musical star in the 1910s and 1920s. She was in a handful of Hollywood films, but she was more successful on the stage. The real Frank Carter, played by MacRae, married Miller in 1919 and he died in 1920 in a car accident, like the film says. Miller then married actress Mary Pickford’s brother, Jack Pickford, in 1922 and they divorced in 1927. She then married dancer Chester Lee O’Brien in 1934 until her death in 1936. Miller died from complications of a nasal surgery at the age of 37.

-In 1942, Louella Parsons announced Joan Leslie was playing the role of Marilyn Miller. Parsons hinted Rita Hayworth and Ann Miller may have been in the running for the film, according to a July 27, 1942 column in the St. Petersburg Times. Apparently plans for this film fell through or were delayed, because in 1947, Louella Parsons then announced June Haver would play the role of Miller in a St. Petersburg Times column. This time, Parsons says Vera-Ellen was “heartbroken” she didn’t receive the role of Miller, because she was a “leading candidate.”

-Last film of Lee Wilde. Her twin sister Lyn continued acting in films until 1953.

-Gordon MacRae’s second film.

-Will Roger Jr. plays his father Will Rogers.

Notable Songs:

-“Look for the Silver Lining” sung by June Haver

-“Who?” sung by Ray Bolger

-“Time on My Hands” sung by Gordon MacRae

My Review:
Visually “Look for the Silver Lining” is fun and colorful, but the actual plot is rather bland.

For a biographical film, you learn very little about Marilyn Miller other than the fact that she existed, was a very famous performer and one of her husbands died. However, I guess real life is a bit too long to stuff into an hour and 41 minute film.

Like most biographical films made during this time, the details are fairly sanitized. Only one out of three of Miller’s real husbands are discussed in the film- which is Frank Carter, the vaudeville actor who died in the car accident. At the end of the film, Miller’s character marries a character named Henry Doran, played by Dick Simmons. I’m not sure if this is supposed to be Jack Pickford, who was Miller’s next husband, or maybe a combination of her last two husbands: Pickford and Chester Lee O’Brien.

In real life, Miller also was an alcoholic and had issues with sinus infections. She died of complications after surgery that was dealing with her sinus problems.

In the film, it was implied that Miller’s health was declining but it was vague. She pirouettes as she practices for a show, then grabs her head in pain. She tells her friend Jack Donahue that her doctor says she has to “stop eating lobster, champagne, staying out late and dancing.”

Gordon MacRae as Frank Carter and June Haver as Marilyn Miller in "Look for the Silver Lining"

Gordon MacRae as Frank Carter and June Haver as Marilyn Miller in “Look for the Silver Lining”

Though Miller died in 1936, the film ends with her dancing in a colorful music number and singing the title song “Look for the Silver Lining.” But this ending is fairly typical for a musical biographical film where the lead’s life my end rather tragically. These brightly colored musicals don’t want to end on a low note, killing off the main star.

For example: “The Helen Morgan Story” (1957) about Helen Morgan (starring Ann Blyth) who died in 1941, ends with a banquet held in honor of the recovering alcoholic singer.

“The Incendiary Blonde” (1945) starring Betty Hutton as Texas Guinan, who died in 1933, ends with Hutton slowly walking out of a hospital, worried about her lover.

The stand out stars in this film for me are Ray Bolger and Gordon MacRae. June Haver’s dancing was lovely, but she wasn’t that memorable. I will say that this is one film where the leading lady actually looks fairly similar to the woman she is playing. But I was legitimately sad when MacRae’s character was killed off. I wanted to see more of him and hear more of his singing. Charles Ruggles was fun comic relief and Rosemary DeCamp is always the perfect mother.

I’m not trying to be harsh with “Look for the Silver Lining,” but there are other fabricated musical biographies that are more entertaining than this one. See: Yankee Doodle Dandy, Annie Get Your Gun, Love Me or Leave Me or Hans Christian Anderson.

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